Ornette

Jul. 14th, 2017 05:56 pm
jazzy_dave: (black jazz)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
It was a wonderful relaxing day ending up in a meet with Phil at our local Spoons pub last night. Today i am back tn the fray again.Having done two visits already,one in Hempstead Valley and a pub food and drink visit in Maidstone , soon i shall be heading off to Canterbury via Faversham.

I have received for payments from companies i work for as well.So i have ordered this box set (on Amazon) of all of Ornette Coleman's Atlantic Recordings.

Beauty is a Rare Thing: The Complete Atlantic Recordings




Ornette is mentioned in the Wire Primers book ,and this set is highly recommended and only £26! This is one of the six discs on the set - which can be purchased individually, Free Jazz LP.


Ornette Coleman ~ Free Jazz





jazzy_dave: (bookish)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
Annie Darling "The Little Bookshop Of Lonely Hearts"  (Harper Collins)






This is one of those books my brother gave me in one of his clearance endeavours. He can do that again. Also, this is not the type of book i would  normally  not read,,as romance novels per se are not my forte,  despite it being about a bookshop called Bookends. Anyway, i took the plunge and emerged pleasantly surprised.

I have to be honest though, in the beginning I wasn't sure if I liked either Posy or Sebastian, she definitely didn't sound like the kind of person who should be left in charge of a bookshop never mind be bequeathed one and then be expected to make it flourish. And right from the very beginning I got the impression that Sebastian is supposed to be her love interest, but he was so rude that I honestly didn't think I could read this book if he was her love interest. Thankfully, as the story progressed we see a slightly softer side to Sebastian, he offers to help Posy and to begin with we don't understand the reasoning behind it but it all becomes clear.


I loved the banter back and fro between Posy and Sebastian, as well as all the other quirky characters such as Nina and Verity.

Bookends is the kind of place that I would love to work! A small business, where you can make close friends in work colleagues, while doing a job you feel passionate about!

And for each and every sad moment within this story, there were happy moments. Happy moments that made you smile without thinking about it. And you cant really ask for more than that.

A good easy to read novel.
jazzy_dave: (bookish)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
Jack Kerouac "Heaven and Other Poems" (Grey Fox Press)




The poems in this volume includes a series of his blues poems - San Francisco Blues; MacDougal Street Blues; Orizaba Blues; Orlando Blues - and a letter on his theory of jazz poetry. It includes two short autobiographies and a series of letters between Kerouac and a publisher.

The latter gives real insight into his writing: "I would like everybody in the world to tell his full life confession and tell it HIS OWN WAY" from a letter; or his essentials for modern prose which includes "telling the true story of the world in interior monologue" and " remove literary, grammatical and syntactical inhibition".

A couple of interesting quotes from "Heaven":

"The Church? Earth's dogmatic mistakes have nothing to do with Heaven"

"For we all go back where we came from, God's Lit Brain, his transcendent Eye of Wisdom / And there's your bloody circle called samsara by the ignorant Buddhists, who will still be funny Masters up there, bless em."

A short book but well worth having if you are a Kerouac fan.

Book 41 - A.Alvarez "Night"

Jul. 8th, 2017 02:01 pm
jazzy_dave: (bookish)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
A. Alvarez "Night: An Exploration of Night Life, Night Language, Sleep and Dreams" (Vintage)





Alvarez brings a kind of journalistic quality to a subject that he apparently devoted four years to bring to fruition in this book. He looks at it from a bunch of different angles. The book takes on - dreams and nightmares, the fear of the dark, night shift work, the history of lighting, night motif's in painting and literature, and soon.


As a critic he analyses and reflects on what artists have had to say on the subject. The book starts with the poem, Acquainted with the Night, by Robert Frost and ends with a quote from Krapp's Last Tape, by Samuel Beckett. Many pages have passages from writers such as Stevenson, Freud and Coleridge, with Alvarez using them to examine a subject like the connection between dreams and surrealism.


The photographs and paintings that Alvarez chose to accompany his text are particularly haunting. One in particular: an untitled photograph by Roger Parry shows a dark room with a dull beam of light streaming in through a half-opened door. The photograph was taken from inside the room and a few objects can be dimly seen: a daguerrotype propped upside-down against the dark wainscoting; a length of rope that might be fastened into a noose. Alvarez has this to say about the photograph: "I no longer remember how I populated the darkness, but I remember the fear itself, particularly of the darkness that shrouded the upper floor, where I slept."

I found this a fascinating book.He's serious but playful, has a casual sophistication, a curious and sceptical mind, and a direct writing style.

Well worth seeking out.
Page generated Jul. 21st, 2017 08:31 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios